VSTO & .NET & Excel

January 13, 2014

VBA Enumeration Database

Filed under: .NET & Excel, Database, Developer sites, Excel, SQL Server, SQLite, Tools, Valentina DB — Dennis M Wallentin @ 3:24 pm

Whenever CodeProject send their newsletter I take the time to read it more carefully. Although not every time but quite often I find one or more gems among the presented articles.

The article VBA Enumeration Database should be read by every seriously MS Excel developer as it covers one of the cornerstones in VBA development; interaction with databases.

So I recommend You to click on the above URL, start to read and then download the code!

Please note, You must be a member of CodeProject to download.

Kind regards,
Dennis

PS:¬†I must confess; I have not written a single line of VBA code for the last 6-8 months. At least, what I can remember ūüėČ

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January 1, 2014

Syncfusion’s Free Offers

Filed under: .NET & Excel, Apps for Office, COM Add-ins, Excel, SQL Server, SQLite, Tools, UI Design, Valentina DB, VSTO & Excel — Dennis M Wallentin @ 8:37 pm

During 2013 Syncfusion have been releasing additional books in the series of Succintly. They cover a lot of development areas and are all free (PDFs).

Not only books are shipped free. Syncfusion offers also for Hobbyist the Essential Studio for JavaScript.

Per se it’s not free as You need to pay $ 1 for 1 license which is also valid for next offer.

Another offer for Hobbyist  is the Essential Studio for WinRT (Windows 8.1)

The JavaScript Studio should attract Excel developers who develop so called Office Apps.

Anyway, I find it nice when a company like Syncfusion actually see the group of hobbyists.

Yes, I’m a full member of the Hobbyists group ūüėČ

Happy Coding!

Dennis

November 19, 2013

Add-in Express Series for Excel Beginners

Filed under: .NET & Excel, Apps for Office, COM Add-ins, Excel, SQL Server, Tools, Valentina DB, VSTO & Excel, XLLs — Dennis M Wallentin @ 7:51 pm

Add-in Express have published a great number of interesting articles for Excel beginners. To be more specific, Excel beginners who use their All-in Framework .NET to create COM Add-ins, RDTs and Functions Libraries (XLLs and UDFs).

Here is the link to the first article in the series:
http://www.add-in-express.com/creating-addins-blog/2013/09/23/excel-addin-development-application-base-objects/

Enjoy!

Kind regards,
Dennis

July 20, 2013

Ribbon Control – Xojo – J√©r√©mie Leroy

Filed under: SQL Server, SQLite, Tools, UI Design, Valentina DB, Xojo — Dennis M Wallentin @ 2:57 pm

This is the first post of a series that will present controls and tools by Jérémie Leroy.

Why I pick these controls is quite simple to explain:

  • All controls and tools are of high quality
  • They are easy to work with, even for a newbie like me
  • They all support the RAD concept
  • The prices are reasonable given what we get for the money

First out is the tool for creating Ribbon UI in an easy way. It’s a visual designer tool that generates the required code to show and use the Ribbon UIs.

Interesting, when creating the Ribbon UI and the code for it we actually run in Debug mode.

The elements of the control are as the following picture shows:

RibbonElements

It’s easy to keep these three elements in mind. Next, let us have a look on the control itself. The following screen shot views the Ribbon UI tool:

RibbonStart
To start to add Tabs, Sections and Buttons we simple click on the Reorder Ribbon button. When adding new elements we can at the same time manipulate the added item. The following shows tries to show it:

RibbonUI1

When all the elements have been added to the Ribbon it can look as the following screen shot:

RibbonUIFinish

The last step to do is to generate the code to create the Ribbon UI. Click the button To XML/Xojo and it will very fast generate the required code to build the customized Ribbon UI.

RibbonUIFinal

The next and final step is simple to cut & paste the generated Xojo code to the Open event of  the RibbonCanvas objectet.

 Dim T As RibbonTab
 Dim S As RibbonSection
 Dim B As RibbonButton

 //Tab 1
 T = New RibbonTab("Home")
 me.Tabs.Append T

 S = New RibbonSection("Help")
 T.Sections.Append S

 B = New RibbonButton("btnDBHelp", "Database", Ico("database-help"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "database-help"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnQHelp", "Query", Ico("query-help"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "query-help"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnRHelp", "Report", Ico("report-help"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "report-help"
 S.Buttons.Append B

 S = New RibbonSection("Record")
 T.Sections.Append S

 B = New RibbonButton("btnAdd", "Add", Ico("button_green_add"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "button_green_add"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnUpdate", "Update", Ico("button_green_down"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "button_green_down"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnDelete", "Delete", Ico("button_red_delete"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "button_red_delete"
 S.Buttons.Append B

 S = New RibbonSection("Maintenance", "Maintenance")
 T.Sections.Append S

 B = New RibbonButton("btnDBCompress", "Compress Database", Ico("compress_database"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "compress_database"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnTableCompress", "Compress Table", Ico("compress_table"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "compress_table"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnDBBackup", "Backup Database", Ico("database_backup"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "database_backup"
 S.Buttons.Append B

 S = New RibbonSection("Query")
 T.Sections.Append S

 B = New RibbonButton("btnQuery", "Query", Ico("query"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "query"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnLookup", "Lookup", Ico("query_lookup"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "query_lookup"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnQueryDB", "Query Database", Ico("query-database"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "query-database"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnExecute", "Execute", Ico("query-execute"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "query-execute"
 S.Buttons.Append B

 S = New RibbonSection("Report")
 T.Sections.Append S

 B = New RibbonButton("btnReport", "Report", Ico("report"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "report"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnOpenReport", "Open Report", Ico("report_open-add"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "report_open-add"
 S.Buttons.Append B
 B = New RibbonButton("btnMailReport", "Mail Report", Ico("report_open-mail"), Nil)
 B.IconName = "report_open-mail"
 S.Buttons.Append B

me.Height = me.BestHeight

As part of the solution there is also a support function to work with the added icons:


Ico(Name As String, Debug As Boolean = False) As Picture

If IconList.HasKey(Name) then
 Return IconList.Value(Name)
 elseif Debug then
 #if DebugBuild
 break
 #endif
 End If

 Return New Picture(1, 1, 32)
 Return Nil

As we can see, it’s a quite straight forward code. It simple to follow and to maintenance it.

Here are the interesting links to J√©r√©mie’s site and productpage:

Enjoy!

Kind regards,

Dennis

Edit Note: Of course, I should also mention that the professional icons in use are made by Axialis.

April 7, 2013

Time to move on – Exit MVP Program

Filed under: .NET & Excel, .NET Books, Apps for Office, COM Add-ins, Excel, SQL Server, VSTO & Excel, VSTO Books, XLLs — Dennis M Wallentin @ 4:27 pm

Around 2005 – 2006 I peaked with MS Excel, since then I have slightly moved away from it year to year. In 2010 I was honored to become part of Microsoft’s MVP-program.

Of course, it was interesting to get another position and more closed to Microsoft in general, the production team in¬†particularly. However, I never got excited about it as I was moving away from MS Excel. In addition, I didn’t put much efforts to support the online community in various forms.

Given the circumstances I finally took the decision to not be up for the next renewal process. Looking back I can conclude that it has been an amazing time, from the 80’s and until now. I have also achieved more than what I thought was possible. In other words, I have nothing more to proof. So I can walk away and looking ahead for new adventures in the world of softwares.

But before I close the MS Excel book I have one thing I would like to point out and to discuss. Let me first conclude that Microsoft have never really been loyal to the group of developers for MS Excel. It’s regretful as the group have a strong commitment and interest of developing MS Excel further.

In the beginning we got the macro language, XLM, which we started to use more and more. Then VBA and VB6 came and Microsoft asked us to drop XLM in favor of these two Basic languages. 10 years later VB6 was depreciated and since then VBA also risk to be depreciated. Microsoft asked us to replace them with .NET and VSTO. 10 years later .NET and VSTO face the same situation as VB6, i.e to be depreciated. Microsoft now ask us to start develop with Apps for Office. Given the short history, i.e about 20 years, it’s remarkable the number of changes Microsoft have done.

In my opinion, Microsoft’s trust capital is now below zero due to lack of loyalty Microsoft show the group of MS Excel developers. The question is not about Apps for Office rather what will come next?

But it’s no longer of interest for me. I’m moving along and I set focus on other tools and platforms. The blog will change its name and extend its contest with other tools including other platforms. Actually, I will go back to VB6, pick up new tools like PowerBasic and PureBasic which¬†will allow me to write everything in code, including the UI.¬†¬†Other tools I have picked up is Real Studio and LiveCode together with my two favorites databases; Valentina and Ninja Pro.

I have uninstalled Office 2013 and replaced it with the 2000 version. I may re install it later on in case I find Apps for Office interesting unless it has been already replaced with something new!

It has been a fantastic time in my life to be part of the online Excel community and be part of an exciting time for MS Excel. My English has been improved with >90 %.  I have some good friends around the globe . So without mention any names I would finally say:

Thank You all!

Kind regards,
Dennis

March 24, 2013

Clean Up!

As part of my maintenance, in order to keep the computer fresh, is to regular run the built-in tool Free up disk space.

The tool is accessible via the following commands:

  • Start Button > Control Panel > System and Security > Administrative Tools > Free up disk space

After running it the following dialog is showed:

CleanUp

Yes, I admit it was some time ago since I last executed the clean up process. However, I cannot understand how Temporary Files can grow to a size of 30 GB?

In addition, does anyone know if it exist a small utility that can automatically clean up Temporary Files?

The general recommendation is to not forget to run the Free up disk space on a regular basis!

Kind regards,
Dennis

February 22, 2013

POEditor: An Excellent Translation Tool!

It’s very¬†exceptionable¬†that I get thrilled over a software. The last time must be the first version of Excel 2.1d, that’s nearly 30 ago, I got in my hand!

I can only say that it’s an excellent software and it’s also free. It’s so good that I say its speak for itself.

The URL to POEditor is: http://poeditor.com/

Enjoy!

Kind regards,
Dennis

January 9, 2013

SamLogic Visual Installer 2012 available in English!

Filed under: .NET & Excel, COM Add-ins, Excel, Installation Tools, SQL Server, VSTO & Excel — Dennis M Wallentin @ 3:18 am

In some earlier blog articles I have written about and mentioned Visual Installer 2012 from SamLogic, a Swedish Company. The key feature for Excel developers is that Visual Install 2012 can create professional installation programs for all Excel files and in particular for native add-ins as it can both install/activate as well as uninstalling add-ins in a very smooth way. Of course, it can handle both 32 bits and 64 bits versions.

For more information please see my blog article: Install and Activate Add-ins in Excel with SamLogic’s Visual Installer

The good news is that Visual Installer is now available in English too.

Screen shot of the Main Window of Visual Installer 2012:

VS2012

Visual Installer also includes a script commands that gives more control of the various processes upon installing and uninstalling softwares.

The following screen shot shows the help section for the script command to get any native add-in activated:

Excel Add-in

For more information about Visual Installer 2012 please see the following links:

Please note that the Excel add-in’s feature is only available in the professional version.

Kind regards,
Dennis

August 27, 2012

Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 – PowerPivot for Microsoft Excel 2010

Filed under: .NET & Excel, Excel, PowerPivot Books, SQL Server, Tools, VSTO & Excel — Dennis M Wallentin @ 12:43 pm

Microsoft have recently released a new version of its excellent tool, PowerPivot, for Excel 2010. It can be downloaded from

Kind regards,
Dennis

April 1, 2012

New SQL Server 2012 Tools for MS Excel 2010

Filed under: .NET & Excel, COM Add-ins, Excel, SQL Server, Tools, VSTO & Excel — Dennis M Wallentin @ 12:48 am

Microsoft has recently released a new version of their toolkit Data¬†Mining for¬†MS Excel. It’s for SQL Server 2012 and explicit target MS Excel 2010. To download it click on the following text:

In addition, Microsoft has released a new version of their PowerPivot tool for MS Excel. To download it click on the following text:

Enjoy!

Kind regards,
Dennis

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